Queen's Gambit Declined:

3...dxc4

A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)
[Event "3...dxc4"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Queen's Gambit Declined"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D20"] [Annotator "kestenberg,tal"] [PlyCount "41"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 (3. Nc3) 3... dxc4 {A rare line in practice, probably because by delaying the capture on c4 black gets a queen's gambit accepted position with the moves Nc3 & ...e6 included, of which white's is more desirable} 4. e4 $1 (4. e3 {[%csl Rc3][%cal Ga7a6,Gb7b5,Gc7c5] isn't as good here, in this case ...e6 would be fine and Nc3 less useful. white usually prefers to delay the knight's development to avoid possible queenside expansion from the enemy b pawn in the e3 lines}) 4... c5 {black must challenge the center if they wish to have any chance to equalize} (4... Nf6 5. Bxc4 $14) (4... Nc6 5. Nf3 $16) 5. d5 $1 {with this white maintains some pull} Nf6 (5... exd5 6. Nxd5 (6. exd5) 6... Ne7 7. Bxc4 Nxd5 8. Bxd5 {would transpose into the main line}) 6. Bxc4 exd5 {now it is possible for white to recapture and fight for an opening edvantage either way} 7. Nxd5 {this is considered to be most testing according to modern theory} (7. exd5 {I will also include an old game with this playable alternative} a6 (7... Bd6 8. Qe2+ $1 {is awkward for black on account of...} Qe7 $6 9. Nb5 $1 O-O 10. Qxe7 Bxe7 11. Nc7 $16 {1-0 (36) Volkov,S (2622)-Milov,V (2645) playchess.com INT 2005}) 8. Nf3 Bd6 (8... b5 $6 {is premature, white can take advantage of black's king in the center and play} 9. O-O $1) 9. O-O O-O 10. Bg5 {black's position should be okay with good play, but they quickly went wrong in the aforementioned game. ..} Bf5 11. Nh4 Bg6 12. Nxg6 $14 fxg6 $6 13. Ne4 b5 14. Be2 Qc7 15. Nxd6 Qxd6 16. a4 b4 17. Bc4 $16 Nbd7 18. Re1 Rfe8 $2 19. Re6 $1 $18 Qf8 20. Qe2 Nb6 21. Bxf6 gxf6 22. Re1 Nxc4 23. Rxe8 Rxe8 24. Qxe8 Qxe8 25. Rxe8+ Kf7 26. Re4 Nd2 27. Re2 Nb3 28. d6 Nd4 29. Re4 {1-0 (29) Capablanca,J-Soto Larrea,M Mexico 1933 }) 7... Nxd5 8. Bxd5 {white's bishop is powerful in the center and makes black's development task more complicated} Be7 (8... Bd6 $6 {this is less precise, the bishop doesn't control g5 thus white can start a quick attack against f7 & h7 with Qh5 & Ng5, for example:} 9. Qh5 $1 g6 $6 (9... O-O { ins't complelty safe either} 10. Nf3 {[%cal Gf3g5] ^ Ng5} g6 $6 (10... Nd7 11. Ng5 Nf6 12. Bxf7+ $16) 11. Qh6 Qf6 12. Bg5 Qxb2 13. O-O $16 {as in ½-½ (64) Keres,P-Johansson,M Stockholm 1961 gives white more than enough for a pawn}) 10. Qh6 {black prevents the attack against the f pawn but now has touble developing} Bf8 11. Qe3 Nd7 12. Qb3 Qe7 13. Nf3 h6 14. Bf4 Bg7 15. O-O-O $1 $18 {^ Bd6} (15. Rd1 $1) 15... c4 16. Qxc4 O-O 17. Bd6 $1 {white's initiative brings material gains} Qe8 18. Bxf8 Qxf8 19. Kb1 Nb6 20. Qe2 Nxd5 21. Rxd5 Be6 22. Rb5 Rc8 23. Rxb7 Qc5 24. Rd1 a5 25. Rb5 Qc7 26. Rbd5 Bxd5 27. exd5 Qd6 28. Rd2 a4 29. a3 Rb8 30. Ka2 Qb6 31. d6 Qb3+ 32. Kb1 Qxa3 33. d7 Qf8 34. Ne5 Bxe5 35. Qxe5 Rd8 36. Qd6 Qxd6 37. Rxd6 Kf8 38. Ka2 Ke7 39. Rd2 Ke6 40. Ka3 Ke7 41. h4 {1-0 (41) Petrosian,T (2605)-Radulov,I (2495) Plovdiv 1983 EU-chT [ChessBase]}) 9. Nf3 (9. Qh5 {is less effective with black's bishop on e7} O-O 10. Nf3 Nd7 11. Ng5 Bxg5 12. Bxg5 Nf6 13. Bxf6 Qxf6 $11 {1/2-1/2 (42) Timman,J (2635)-Salov,V (2710) Sanghi Nagar 1994 CBM 042 [Salov,V]}) 9... O-O 10. O-O Na6 {the knight looks the force white's bishop from it's central post but white in return will get a passed pawn} (10... Qb6 {is the alternative, guarding the queenisde and preparing to develop} 11. Be3 Be6 (11... Nc6 12. Rc1 $14) 12. b4 $1 $14 {but here we see that black's queen isn't always ideally placed, and some care would be needed from black ½-½ (31) Jussupow,A (2620) -Ehlvest,J (2585) Belfort 1988}) 11. Bf4 Nb4 12. Re1 Nxd5 13. exd5 Bd6 14. Bxd6 Qxd6 15. Ne5 $14 b5 $6 (15... b6 16. Nc4 Qf6 17. Qa4 Qd8 18. Rad1 $14 {½-½ (32) Wang,Y (2718)-Ivanchuk,V (2744) Tromso 2014 also looked better for white}) 16. a4 $1 Bb7 17. axb5 Qxd5 18. Qxd5 Bxd5 19. Nd7 Rfc8 $2 20. b6 $1 axb6 21. Nxb6 {1-0 (21) Beliavsky,A (2655)-Ehlvest,J (2580) Reykjavik 1988} *

3...Bb4

A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)
[Event "3...Bb4"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Queen's Gambit Declined"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D32"] [Annotator "kestenberg,tal"] [PlyCount "16"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 $5 {a sideline, black pins the knight and develops the Bb4 to an active square. however, black's bishop maybe more vulnerable to attack and with black's pawn already on d5 the "threat" to capture on c3 potentially doubling white's pawns isn't particularly effective} 4. cxd5 {a simple solution, alternatives could transpose into other more theoretical openings} (4. Nf3 Nf6 {is the currently popular ragozin defense}) ( 4. e3 Nf6 {leads to a nimzo-indian defense line}) 4... exd5 5. Bf4 {the best square for the bishop, white develops it before playing e3} Nf6 (5... Ne7 { is an alternative possibility, black intends to develop with ...Bf5, but black is forces to develop less than ideally after} 6. Qa4+ $5 Nbc6 {black's knight's are not on their best squares, and the c pawn is immobilized} 7. e3 O-O (7... Bf5 8. Nf3 O-O 9. Be2 Bd6 10. Bg3 Nc8 11. O-O {1/2-1/2 (26) Chernin, A (2620)-Dizdar,G (2535) Yerevan 1996}) 8. Bd3 Bf5 9. Bxf5 Nxf5 10. Nge2 Bxc3+ 11. bxc3 Nce7 12. Rb1 b6 13. O-O c6 14. c4 Qd7 15. Rfc1 $14 {1-0 (61) Sadler,M (2560)-Baburin,A (2515) Isle of Man 1994}) (5... c6 {is another posibility, cutting out Qa4+ in order to play ...Ne7 & ...Bf5, but in this structure it isn't clear what the ...Bb4 does} 6. e3 Ne7 (6... Bf5 {maybe premature as white can target the bishop} 7. Nge2 Nf6 8. Ng3 Bg6 9. h4 {white gains some time to grab space} h5 10. Bd3 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 g6 12. Bg5 Nbd7 13. e4 $1 Qa5 14. O-O dxe4 15. Ngxe4 Nd5 16. a3 Bxc3 17. bxc3 O-O 18. c4 $16 {1-0 (31) Pashikian, A (2626)-Barsov,A (2489) Tashkent 2014}) 7. Bd3 Bf5 8. Nge2 Bd6 9. O-O O-O 10. f3 {black accomplished their goal and solved the light square bishop problem but the remaining ...Ne7 isn't well placed to challenge white in the center} Bxd3 11. Qxd3 Na6 12. e4 Bxf4 13. Nxf4 Rc8 14. Rad1 $14 {0-1 (62) Moiseenko,A (2648)-Sanikidze,T (2548) Almaty 2016}) (5... c5 {has also been tried at this early moment, play is similar to the main lines but black may have the idea to play a quick ...c4} 6. e3 (6. dxc5 $5 {looks like a playable alternative for white which could lead to the IQP position from ½-½ (20) Lautier,J (2560) -Sosonko,G (2530) Lyon 1991} Nf6 7. e3) 6... Nc6 {accepting an isolated pawn} ( 6... c4 $5 {black avoids IQP positions, grabbing space and a majority on the queenside, white will often look for play in the center} 7. Be2 Nc6 8. Nf3 Nge7 9. O-O O-O 10. a3 Bxc3 11. bxc3 {was played in ½-½ (40) Heberla,B (2544) -Wojtaszek,R (2713) Warsaw 2014, here white might continue with Nd2 and prepare to fight for e4}) 7. dxc5 Nf6 8. Bd3 (8. Nf3 Ne4 9. Rc1) 8... Bxc5 9. Nge2 O-O 10. O-O d4 {black manages to liquidate the IQP, they should do so otherwise they'll simply have a worse structure} 11. exd4 Nxd4 12. Na4 $1 { an important idea} Nxe2+ 13. Bxe2 {white can put a bit of pressure on black's queenside before they can fully mobilize} Nd5 (13... Be7 14. Bf3 {this white's idea, to pressure the queenside and restrict black's development}) 14. Bg3 Be7 15. Bf3 (15. Qb3 $5 {looks more testing in this position}) 15... Be6 16. Re1 Re8 17. Qb3 Qa5 18. Qxb7 Bf6 19. Rad1 Qxa4 20. Bxd5 {½-½ (20) Lautier,J (2560)-Sosonko,G (2530) Lyon 1991}) 6. e3 O-O (6... c5 7. Bd3 (7. dxc5 Nc6 { ½- (14) ½ (20) Lautier,J (2560)-Sosonko,G (2530) Lyon 1991}) 7... Nc6 8. Nge2 {transposes into the main lines}) (6... Ne4 {isn't dangerous} 7. Qa4+ $5 Nc6 8. Bb5 $14 {and white will get a small edge}) (6... c6 {is a carlsbad pawnstructure when the Bb4 seems misplaced} 7. Bd3) 7. Bd3 c5 8. Nge2 (8. dxc5 {is also possible, looking to play against an IQP, without white castling first black will be able to get in ...d4 trading it off, but white can still fight for the advantage by pressurizing the queenside and tying down the black pieces to defense before they can mobilize} Nc6 9. Nge2 Bxc5 10. O-O d4 { leads back to the note on (20) Lautier,J (2560)-Sosonko,G (2530) Lyon 1991} ( 10... Be6 {would be more cooperative and give white a pleasant game with the better structure as in...} 11. Na4 Bd6 12. Rc1 Bxf4 13. Nxf4 Qe7 14. Nc5 Rfd8 15. Qb3 Rab8 16. Qa3 Qd6 17. h3 Bc8 18. Ne2 b6 19. Na6 Bxa6 20. Bxa6 Nb4 21. Nd4 $16 {1-0 (45) Nepomniachtchi,I (2730)-Bocharov,D (2609) Apatity 2011}) 11. exd4 Nxd4 12. Na4 $1 Nxe2+ 13. Bxe2 $14) 8... -- (8... Nc6 9. O-O {now white is ready to isolate black's pawn without allowing the liquidating ...d4 break, so black generally opts for a symmetrical structure, capturing in the center with cxd4. the resulting positions offer white slightly better pieces, though such positions are not easy to win, white isn't risking anything} (9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. O-O d4) 9... cxd4 (9... c4 {isnt great here, white's play with the center pawns would come quickly, e.g.} 10. Bc2 Be6 11. Bg5 $14 {[%cal Gf2f3,Ge3e4] /\ f3 & e4 next}) 10. exd4 (10. Nxd4 Nxd4 11. exd4 Bxc3 $6 12. bxc3 Bg4 13. Qb3 Qd7 14. Rfe1 Rac8 15. Bb5 Qd8 16. Bf1 b6 17. f3 Be6 18. Ba6 Rc6 19. Bb5 Rc8 20. Qa3 Bd7 21. Bf1 a5 22. Rab1 $14 {1-0 (82) Wang,Y (2706)-Hou,Y (2617) Xinghua 2013}) 10... Bg4 (10... Bd6 11. Rc1 Be6 12. Qd2 {white's minors are slightly preferrable, namely the lightsquare bishop}) 11. f3 Bh5 12. a3 Be7 13. Rc1 Rc8 $6 14. Na4 {a note worthy maneuver, improving the Nc3-a4-c5} (14. Bf5 $14) 14... Re8 15. b4 Bg6 16. Nc5 b6 17. Na6 Bxd3 18. Qxd3 {1-0 (47) Bareev,E (2680) -Lautier,J (2560) Paris 1991}) *

3...Be7 with 5...Nf6

A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)
[Event "3...Be7 Petrosian"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Queen's Gambit Declined"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D31"] [Annotator "kestenberg,tal"] [PlyCount "18"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7 {this move order is often played by those wishing to avoid the carlsbad variation after ...Nf6 4.cxd5 ...cxd5 5.Bg5. the petrosian variation, 3...Be7, will often transpose into other main lines if white plays Nf3 here, but those who usually play the carlsbad positions with cxd5 can try...} 4. cxd5 (4. Nf3) 4... exd5 5. Bf4 {white plays a carlsbad pawn structure with Bf4. This has it's pros and cons when compared to the standard carlsbad positions with ...Nf6 and Bg5 instead of ...Be7 & Bf4. on the plus side, white's bishop is more actively placed here, on the other hand it doesn't pressure d5 and black maybe able to offer a timely exchange of bishops with ...Bd6, even at the cost of a tempo. In general it's not known to be especially favorable for black, it just leads to a different game.} Nf6 $5 { this is black's main alternative. Play could transpose into lines with 5...c6 however black has some independent possibilities, involving a quick ...c5 or .. .Bf5} 6. e3 Bf5 {this is the main idea behind the early ...Nf6, otherwise white just gets a favorable carlsbad position with the Bf4. black develops their trouble piece, the light square bishop. white must look to punish this move otherwise black will have solved much of their opening troubles.} (6... c5 {this will often transpose into lines with 0-0 before ...c5 as black can hardly afford to keep the king in the center while opening it.} 7. dxc5 Nc6 ( 7... Bxc5 8. Bb5+ {takes advantage of black's move order to gain some control over black's weak pawn} Nc6 9. Nge2 {or Nf3!? +/=} O-O 10. O-O a6 $1 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Na4 Bd6 13. Rc1 $14 {and white had good play against the hanging pawns in 1-0 (40) Gallego Alcaraz,A (2443)-Paramzina,A (2303) Barcelona 2015}) (7... O-O 8. Bd3) 8. Bd3 d4 (8... O-O 9. Nge2) 9. exd4 (9. Nb5 $5) 9... Qxd4 ( 9... Nxd4 10. Qa4+ Qd7 11. Nb5 $14) 10. Be3 Qb4 11. Nge2 $14) (6... O-O 7. Bd3 c5 $5 (7... c6 $14 {gives white a good version of the carlsbad variation where black hasn't made use of ...Be7 and white has an active Bf4}) 8. Nge2 (8. dxc5 Bxc5 9. Nge2 $14 {is also good for white, delaying the capture hopes for more as here black can liquidate the IQP with} Nc6 10. O-O d4 {as in ½-½ (20) Lautier,J (2560)-Sosonko,G (2530) Lyon 1991, even here white maintians some pressure on black's queenside with} 11. exd4 Nxd4 12. Na4 $1 Nxe2+ 13. Bxe2 $14 {/\ Bf3 / Qb3}) (8. Nf3 Bg4) 8... Nc6 9. O-O {here we have a branching point} cxd4 {leads to a symmetrical structure that can arrise in many queen's gambit positions. though symmetrical structures are known to be drawish, white still maintains an initiative thanks to their pieces being more active than their counterparts, a good example is the classic game Botvinnik,M-Alekhine,A AVRO 1938} (9... c4 {is another option for black. black grabs space on the queenside and will look to create counterplay there, however this is double edged as it takes the pressure off white's center, allowing white to look for play there and eventually on the kingside, for instance} 10. Bb1 a6 11. b3 b5 12. bxc4 bxc4 13. e4 {gave white good play in 1-0 (47) Azmaiparashvili,Z (2620) -Arlandi,E (2435) Reggio Emilia 1992}) (9... a6 {aimed against the typical IQP blockading maneuver Nc3-b5-d4, but this is too slow to equalize} 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. Rc1 Be7 12. h3 Be6 13. Bc2 Rc8 14. Bb3 h6 15. Bh2 Qa5 16. Nd4 $14 Rfd8 17. Nxe6 fxe6 18. e4 $1 {white's bishop pair and will provide an edge in the opening center} Kh8 19. exd5 exd5 20. Ne2 $1 Bc5 21. Nf4 Nd4 22. Nd3 $1 Ba7 23. Rxc8 Rxc8 24. Be5 Rc6 25. Nf4 Nxb3 26. Qxb3 Qb5 27. Qg3 Qa4 $2 28. Nxd5 Bd4 29. Bxf6 Bxf6 30. Qb8+ Kh7 31. Qxb7 Bd4 32. Qd7 Qb5 33. Qf5+ Kh8 34. Qf8+ {1-0 (34) Sadler,M (2515)-Gabriel,C (2490) Altensteig 1992 CBM 031 [Ftacnik,L]}) (9... Bg4 {this natural developing move will force black to part with the bishop} 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. h3 $1 Bxe2 ({blck should exchange the bishop as after} 11... Bh5 $6 12. g4 Bg6 13. Bxg6 hxg6 14. g5 {d5 falls}) 12. Nxe2 Bd6 13. Qb3 Bxf4 14. Nxf4 Qd6 15. Rfd1 $14 Rfd8 16. Rac1 (16. Nxd5 $1 Nxd5 17. Be4 $16) 16... Qb4 17. Qxb4 Nxb4 18. a3 Nxd3 19. Rxd3 Rd7 20. g4 $1 $16 h6 21. f3 Rad8 22. Rcd1 g6 23. Kf2 Kg7 24. h4 g5 25. hxg5 hxg5 26. Ne2 Ng8 27. Nd4 {[%csl Gf5] 1-0 (45) Wojtaszek,R (2726)-Fressinet,L (2707) Wijk aan Zee 2011}) (9... Be6 {a passive move, black reinforces their center pawn and accepts a slightly less active position, thus white can count on a small edge} 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. Rc1 $14 { black has tried many moves here, none a solution.} Bd6 (11... Rc8 12. Nb5) ( 11... a6 12. Na4 {or Bb1}) 12. Bxd6 Qxd6 13. Nb5 (13. Qa4 $5) 13... Qe5 14. Ned4 Rac8 15. Qe2 Bg4 16. Qd2 Bd7 17. h3 a6 18. Nf3 Qe7 19. Nbd4 Ne4 20. Qe2 Rfe8 21. Nxc6 Bxc6 22. Nd4 $14 {white's better pawnstructure and minor pieces are typical for this ...Be6 line ½-½ (40) Bocharov,D (2609)-Zvjaginsev,V (2680) Magnitogorsk 2011}) 10. Nxd4 Nxd4 11. exd4 $14 {as first seen in 1-0 (73) Levenfish,G-Kotov,A Leningrad 1939 is slightly better for white.}) 7. Qb3 $1 {this is the critical test of black's plan, white attack's the queenside which the ...Bf5 move left behind} (7. Nge2 $5 {this is an out of fashion try but it was played in some notable games, white will gain a tempo against the .. .Bf5 with Ng3, however the knight won't control d4, and one way black hopes to equalize is by exchanging in the center with ...c5 dxc5 and ...d4} O-O 8. Rc1 $5 {waiting and discouraging ...c5 is worth considering when black has nothing better than ...c6. white has chances for some pull, but if black plays well they should be able to hold the balance, I'll include one high profile example} ({after the straight forward} 8. Ng3 Be6 9. Bd3 c5 $5 $11 {black plays this move in one go} 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. O-O Nc6 12. Rc1 d4 $5 {sooner or later this is black's equalizing idea}) 8... c6 9. Ng3 Be6 10. Bd3 Re8 11. Qb3 Qb6 12. Qc2 Nbd7 13. O-O g6 14. h3 Bf8 15. Nge2 Rac8 16. Qd2 Nh5 17. Bh2 Ng7 $11 18. g4 Qd8 19. f3 Nb6 20. b3 Ba3 21. Rc2 {1/2-1/2 (21) Kasparov,G (2740)-Karpov,A (2700) Seville 1987}) 7... Nc6 $1 {this is black's idea, ...Nc6 instead of ...c6. black continues development and is prepared to gambit the b pawn. black's defense is pretty resiliant, and it is difficult for white to prove an advantage by simple means} ({passive defenses give white the advantage, for example} 7... b6 $6 8. Nb5 $1 O-O {...Na6?! Qa4!+/-} 9. Nxc7 Nc6 10. Nxa8 Bb4+ 11. Kd1 Ne4 12. Bg3 Nd2 13. Qa4 Nxf1 14. Qxc6 Qe7 15. Qb5 Rc8 16. Nc7 Nxg3 17. hxg3 Rxc7 18. Nf3 Rc2 19. a3 Rxf2 20. Qxb4 Qc7 21. Rc1 Rc2 22. Rxc2 Qxc2+ 23. Ke1 Qc1+ 24. Kf2 Qxh1 25. Qd6 $16 {-Dreev}) ({or} 7... Qc8 8. Nb5 $14 {/\ Rc1}) 8. g4 $5 {this isteresting move maybe white's best try for an advantage. It's purpose is to deflect the black pieces, either the Nf6 from the center, or the Bf5 from it's diagonal} ({to illustrate black's ideas} 8. Qxb7 {offers black enough play after} Nb4 $44 {for instance:} 9. Rc1 (9. Bb5+ Kf8 10. Rc1 a6 11. Be2 Ne8 12. a3 Rb8 13. Qa7 Ra8 14. Qb7 Rb8 15. Qa7 Ra8 {1/2-1/2 (15) Moiseenko, A (2627)-Shomoev,A (2556) Moscow 2007}) 9... O-O 10. a3 Nc2+ 11. Rxc2 Bxc2 12. Bxc7 Qc8 13. Ba6 Qxb7 14. Bxb7 Rab8 15. Bxb8 Rxb8 $11 {1/2-1/2 (47) Ehlvest,J (2650)-Jussupow,A (2605) Linares 1991}) (8. a3 {is the most played move and a decent try. White is glad to have provoked black's knight to c6, now they cut out ...Nb4 and renew the threat to the b pawn. Creating an escape square for the queen, taking into account black's most probable defense, ...Na5, in the process} Na5 9. Qa2 $5 {black can however, with white's queen slightly out of play and a bit of extra development, organize a fair amount of counterplay} O-O 10. Nf3 c6 (10... c5 $143 11. dxc5 Bxc5 12. Be2 Be6 13. Rd1 Bd6 14. Bxd6 Qxd6 15. O-O Rac8 16. Nd4 {1-0 (49) Sargissian,G (2673)-Bakre,T (2509) Kavala 2010}) 11. b4 (11. Be2 b5 $1 12. O-O Nc4 $140 13. Rfc1 Nh5 14. Be5 f6 15. Bg3 Nxg3 16. hxg3 $11 {1/2-1/2 (41) Mamedyarov,S (2765)-Fridman,D (2659) Khanty-Mansiysk 2011}) 11... Nc4 12. Bxc4 dxc4 13. Qxc4 a5 14. b5 Rc8 15. O-O cxb5 16. Qxb5 Rxc3 17. Qxf5 $13 {1-0 (38) Shipov,S (2625)-Marciano,D (2513) FIDE.com 2001}) 8... Nxg4 $5 {the knight is deflected from the defense of the d pawn, but black gets a pawn too and black's alternatives are considerably worse} (8... Bg6 $143 {is simply met} 9. g5 $16 {chasing the knight form the center, /\ Qxb7 / Qxd5} Nh5 10. Qxb7 {1-0 (34) Lorparizangeneh,S (2442)-Javanbakht,N (2422) Teheran 2016}) (8... Bc8 $143 9. h3 $1 {by playing against the ...Bc8 one wonders what the ...Nc6 is doing there} (9. g5 {is premature here, after} Nh5 {here theres no Qxb7, the point behind ...Bc8}) 9... Bd6 $6 (9... Na5 10. Qc2 c6 11. O-O-O $5 $14 Be6 12. Kb1 Rc8 13. Bd3 b5 14. Nge2 {1-0 (25) Bocharov, D (2618)-Rychagov,A (2538) Irkutsk 2010}) 10. Bxd6 cxd6 11. Nge2 h5 12. g5 Ne4 13. h4 O-O 14. Bg2 Bg4 15. Nf4 Rc8 16. Qxd5 $16 {0-1 (47) Morozevich,A (2700) -Onischuk,A (2683) Reggio Emilia 2011 CBM 140 [Krasenkow,M]}) (8... Bxg4 $143 { removes the bishop from the b1-h7 diagonal} 9. Qxb7 $1 {this move is better now that ...Nb4 is not as dangerous without the ...Bf5 guarding c2} Nb4 (9... Bd7 10. Bxc7 Qc8 {1-0 (34) Fridman,D (2660)-Azarov,S (2667) Jurmala 2012} 11. Qxc8+ Rxc8 12. Bg3 Nb4 13. Kd2 Ne4+ 14. Nxe4 dxe4 15. a3 Ba4 16. Rc1 $16) 10. Rc1 Bf5 {1-0 (40) Aleksandrov,A (2617)-Dobrowolski,A (2335) Warsaw 2008} 11. a3 $1 Rb8 12. Qxa7 Nc2+ 13. Rxc2) 9. Qxd5 $1 {this is the correct way to take black's pawn} (9. Nxd5 $143 $6 {was too loose in the line's debut} O-O 10. Bg2 Bh4 11. Bg3 Be6 $17 {0-1 (39) Topalov,V (2725)-Kasparov,G (2795) Linares 1997}) (9. Qxb7 $143 {is also too risky to claim any advantage} Nb4 10. Bb5+ Kf8 $132) 9... -- (9... Qxd5 {this simple continuation leads to some advantage for white with good play, the earlier exchange of a flank pawn for a center pawn in is their favor.} 10. Nxd5 Bb4+ ({alternatively, on} 10... Bh4 {white has the simple} 11. Bg3 {the direct Nxc7 is also good} Bxg3 12. hxg3 O-O-O 13. Bg2 Rxd5 14. Bxd5 Nb4 15. e4 $16 Nc2+ $2 16. Kd2 Nxa1 17. exf5 Rd8 18. Bf3 Nxf2 19. Rxh7 Rxd4+ $2 20. Ke3 {1-0 (26) Brodowski,P (2411)-Dobrowolski,A (2321) Wroclaw 2012 }) (10... O-O-O 11. Nxe7+ {is also good for white, with the bishops and stronger center, as in} Nxe7 12. Rc1 Nd5 13. Bg3 Rhe8 14. Ne2 c6 15. Nc3 $14 { 1-0 (40) Najer,E (2647)-Azarov,S (2618) Czechia 2013}) 11. Nxb4 Nxb4 12. Rc1 c6 13. a3 Nd5 (13... Nd3+ 14. Bxd3 Bxd3 15. f3 Nf6 16. Kd2 Bg6 17. Be5 $14 { is still a little better for white thanks to their center ½-½ (41) Wojtaszek, R (2713)-Onischuk,A (2672) Poikovsky 2012}) 14. h3 $1 (14. Bg3 $6 Ngxe3 15. fxe3 Be4) (14. Ne2 $5) 14... Ngf6 (14... Nxf4 15. hxg4 Nd3+ 16. Bxd3 Bxd3 17. Kd2 $14 {1-0 (41) Lorparizangeneh,S (2319)-Gavrilov,A (2485) Moscow 2015}) 15. Ne2 ({white got a similar advantage in} 15. Be5 Nd7 16. Bd6 N7b6 17. b3 Rd8 18. Bg3 O-O 19. Ne2 Rfe8 20. Rg1 Re6 21. Kd2 $14 {when black has some counterplay but white has the long term trumps. 0-1 (57) Lenderman,A (2623)-Le,Q (2697) Las Vegas 2015}) 15... O-O 16. Be5 Nd7 17. Bd6 Rfe8 18. Nf4 Nxf4 19. Bxf4 $14 { white's strong center and bishop pair are plusses in the endgame 0-1 (62) Gustafsson,J (2625)-Baramidze,D (2611) Oberhof 2012}) (9... Qc8 {with this move black keeps the queens on in an attempt to exploit the centralized position of white's queen, this can result in sharp play} 10. Qg2 {this multipurpose move is the main line, running away from danger, aiming down the g line and preparing to build a center. some analsys suggests that back obtains good counterplay in some little tested lines here, and the new move 10. a3!? is certainly a noteworthy try} (10. a3 $5 {is the very latest theory and deserves attention. it's idea is to cut out any ...Nb4 ideas, which happen in some of the more troublesome Qg2 lines} Nf6 11. Qg2 {the retreat Qf3!? here, leaving the g line for the rook, is also worth consideration} O-O 12. Bc4 { the computer suggests h4!? instead of this, which lead to imbalanced play after } Na5 $5 13. Ba2 c5 $1 14. dxc5 Qxc5 15. Nge2 Nc4 16. Bxc4 Qxc4 17. Nd4 Bg6 18. Qxb7 {nerves of steel, but what else?} Rfe8 19. Qb5 {it is amusing to see white chase black's queen around to safety, not allowing it to activate} Qc8 20. Qc6 Qh3 21. Qf3 Qd7 22. O-O {and white has dodged some trouble but black still has compensation for a pawn ½-½ (38) Nakamura,H (2780)-Topalov,V (2749) Saint Louis 2017}) 10... O-O (10... Nb4 {here this isn't too problematic following} 11. Rc1 $1 O-O 12. a3 Bh4 $6 {dubious} (12... Nd3+ 13. Bxd3 Bxd3 14. Nge2 $14) 13. axb4 $1 Bxf2+ 14. Kd2 Qe6 15. Nd1 Rfe8 16. Rc3 Bh4 17. Bc4 $18 { 1-0 (66) Charochkina,D (2362)-Batsiashvili,N (2476) Mamaia 2016}) 11. e4 Bg6 $1 {this simple move is the most testing} (11... Nxd4 $6 {is a piece sacrifice black can try, but it's not totally sound} 12. O-O-O $1 {now black has two pieces hanging, and white's king has evaded ...Nc2+} Bc5 13. Nf3 $1 {with some precise moves white gets the advantage} Rd8 {...Nxf3 exf5!} 14. Nxd4 Bxd4 15. Be2 $1 Be6 16. Bxg4 Bxg4 17. Rxd4 Rxd4 18. h3 $16 {[%cal Gf4e5] or Rg1}) (11... Bxe4 $6 {was tried in a top level game but is also not completely correct} 12. Nxe4 Bb4+ 13. Nc3 Qf5 14. Be2 $1 Rfe8 15. Kf1 $1 Nf6 16. Bh6 g6 17. Qg5 $5 Nxd4 18. Rd1 Bxc3 19. bxc3 Ne4 20. Qxf5 Nxf5 21. Bd2 Rad8 22. Be1 Rxd1 23. Bxd1 $16 Re5 24. Nf3 Rc5 25. Bb3 Nxc3 26. Ne5 $1 Ne4 27. Nxf7 Kg7 28. f3 Nf6 29. Bf2 Rc3 30. Ng5 Nh5 31. Ke2 Nf4+ 32. Kd2 Rd3+ 33. Kc2 Kh6 34. Nf7+ Kh5 35. Rg1 h6 36. Ne5 Ne3+ 37. Kb1 Rc3 38. Nxg6 Nh3 39. Nf4+ $1 {1-0 (39) Aronian,L (2808) -Kramnik,V (2785) Monte Carlo 2011 CBM 142 [Krasenkow,M]}) 12. O-O-O Nf6 13. f3 Rd8 {although white's position looks impressive, black has some hidden resources to start quick counterplay against white's king, the only game that reached this position in practice was a good example} 14. Nge2 $6 {this move was tried in a GM game, but it's clearly not the best white can do} ({the natural reply d5 looks strong but here} 14. d5 Nb4 $1 {threatening to capture on d5 causes some problems. perhaps the inspiration for the new 10.a3!? move.} 15. Qh3 Qb8 $1 {/\ ...b5!? with good counterplay}) (14. Be3 Nb4 {is similar} 15. Qh3 Qb8) (14. Qf2 $5 {maybe white should try this novelty, with chances for both sides after ...a6 preparing ...b5}) 14... b5 $1 {a strong reply, black creates very dangerous counterplay} 15. Be3 $6 b4 $1 16. Na4 {and now in ½-½ (103) Fridman,D (2670)-Prusikin,M (2545) Bad Wiessee 2012 black should have struck with...} Nxe4 $1 17. fxe4 Qe6 $1 18. d5 Rxd5 $1 {with a better game for black}) *

3...Be7 with 5...c6

A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)
[Event "3...Be7 Petrosian"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Queen's Gambit Declined"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D31"] [Annotator "kestenberg,tal"] [PlyCount "24"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bf4 c6 {this move is the most flexible and played at this juncture} 6. e3 (6. Qc2 {doesn't prevent black's idea to develop with ...Bf5 as they can play} g6 $1 {/\ ...Bf5}) 6... Bf5 { This is one of black's main ideas in the petrosian line with 3...Be7. Black is able to develop the problem lightsquare bishop to ...f5 as they have additional defenses against white's Qb3 moves (beacuase the move 3...Nf6 allowing ...Bg5 wasn't played). but things aren't so simple, white often still has ways to maintain pressure and the ...Bf5 maybe at risk to tempo moves as white develops} (6... Bd6 $5 {this is another attempt to bring the bishop to f5, black first plays ...Bd6 looking to simplify, then intends ...Ne7 to support ...Bf5. However this is time consuming and white has good counter measures} 7. Bxd6 Qxd6 8. Bd3 Ne7 (8... Nf6 9. Nge2) 9. Qc2 {aimed against ... Bf5 looks best, white seems to maintain an edge against the ideas black has tried.} (9. f3 $5 {is a direct approach which was featured in a later karpov kasparov match, intending to meet ...Bf5 with e4!} Nf5 $5 (9... Bf5 $140 $6 10. e4) (9... b6 $6 10. Nge2 Ba6 11. e4 {is good for white: 0-1 (60) Kasparov,G (2812)-Karpov,A (2619) Valencia 2009}) 10. Qd2 Qh6 11. Bxf5 Bxf5 12. Nge2 Na6 13. O-O-O $5 O-O-O 14. g4 Bd7 15. h4 Qd6 {black managed to get the pieces out and following} 16. Nf4 $11 {the game was approximately level in 1-0 (51) Kasparov,G (2812)-Karpov,A (2619) Valencia 2009}) (9. Qb1 $5 {is another interesting approach, white angles both against ...Bf5 and for a minority attack, an example of how play could proceed:} g6 10. b4 Bf5 11. b5 O-O 12. Bxf5 Nxf5 13. Nge2 Nd7 14. O-O {black has exchanged lightsquare bishops but white has already made progress with their minority attack and will have a small structural edge ½-½ (25) Bacrot,E (2716)-Fressinet,L (2718) Germany 2011}) 9... g6 {to support ...Bf5 can be answered directly with} (9... Nd7 { is a bit slow, white can prepare action in the center with e4 before black completely mobilizes} 10. Nge2 (10. Nf3 {is also playable here} Nf6 11. h3 $14 {with the idea to play g4 aimed against the Bc8 and 0-0-0}) 10... h6 {/\ ...0-0 } (10... Nf6 11. f3 O-O 12. O-O Bd7 13. e4 {was good for white in 1-0 (62) Vaisser,A (2525)-Kharitonov,A (2520) Novosibirsk 1989, but the break maybe even stronger with a little more preparation!}) 11. O-O O-O 12. a3 a5 13. Rad1 (13. f3 $5) 13... b6 14. e4 $1 {white strikes white the iron is hot} dxe4 15. Nxe4 Qb8 16. N2c3 Ba6 17. Bxa6 Rxa6 18. d5 $1 Nxd5 19. Nxd5 cxd5 20. Rxd5 Ra7 21. Qd2 $16 Nc5 $2 22. Nf6+ $1 gxf6 23. Qxh6 f5 24. Qg5+ Kh8 25. Qf6+ Kg8 26. Rxf5 Ne4 27. Qh4 Re8 28. Rh5 f5 {1-0 (28) Kasparov,G (2812)-Karpov,A (2619) Valencia 2009}) (9... b6 {intends to exchange lightsquare bishops, but it costs a tempo and creates some weaknesses on the queenside} 10. Nf3 {is logical, white would like to open the center with e4 and exploit black's weakened queenside, the knight is most active here.} (10. Nge2 {isn't as danerous here} Ba6 11. O-O Bxd3 12. Qxd3 O-O 13. f3 Nd7 14. Rad1 (14. e4 dxe4 15. fxe4 c5) 14... f5 15. Ng3 Rae8 16. e4 fxe4 17. fxe4 Rxf1+ 18. Rxf1 Rf8 $11 {0-1 (51) Anand,V (2788)-Jakovenko,D (2736) Moscow 2009}) 10... Ba6 11. O-O Bxd3 12. Qxd3 Nd7 (12... O-O $142 13. e4 {or Rac1!?} dxe4 14. Nxe4 Qd5 15. Qa3 Qxe4 16. Rfe1 Qd5 17. Re5 Qd8 18. Rxe7 c5 19. Ree1 cxd4 20. Rac1 Nd7 21. Nxd4 { 1/2-1/2 (27) Peralta,F (2601)-Jojua,D (2505) Vrachati 2011}) 13. e4 $1 { this strong lever was played in a model game by WCH Carlsen} O-O (13... dxe4 14. Nxe4 Qd5 15. Qa3 $1) 14. e5 $14 Qe6 15. Rae1 Rfe8 (15... f6 $5) 16. Nh4 $1 Ng6 (16... f5 $5) 17. Nxg6 Qxg6 18. Qd2 Nf8 19. f4 Qf5 $2 20. Nd1 f6 21. Ne3 Qd7 22. Qd3 fxe5 23. dxe5 Ne6 24. f5 Nc5 25. Qd4 Ne4 26. Nxd5 $1 Qxd5 (26... cxd5 27. Rxe4 $18) 27. Qxe4 Rad8 28. e6 (28. f6 $5) 28... Qxe4 29. Rxe4 Rd6 30. g4 Kf8 31. g5 Ke7 32. Kg2 Rd5 33. Kg3 Kd6 34. h4 c5 35. f6 gxf6 36. gxf6 Rd3+ 37. Kh2 Rd2+ 38. Kh1 {1-0 (38) Carlsen,M (2772)-Jakovenko,D (2742) Nanjing 2009 CBM 133 [Krasenkow,M]}) 10. f3 $5 {aimed against ...Bf5, preparing e4} ( 10. Nf3 {is also playable, intending to play a quick e4 after ...Bf5 & Bxf5} Bf5 11. Bxf5 Nxf5 12. O-O O-O 13. e4 dxe4 14. Nxe4 $14 {1-0 (28) So,W (2682) -Tolentino,R (2364) Tagaytay City 2013}) 10... Nd7 (10... Bf5 $141 $6 {is dubious now on account of} 11. e4 $1 $16) (10... O-O 11. Nge2) 11. Nge2 O-O 12. O-O c5 $5 (12... b6 13. e4) 13. Qd2 (13. dxc5 $5 {with play against the IQP also looks good}) 13... a6 14. Rad1 cxd4 15. exd4 {kasparov allows a symmetrical position and goes on to demonstrate how white's more active pieces provide a nice advantage dispite the even pawnstructure} Nf6 16. g4 Kg7 17. Qf4 Rd8 18. Rfe1 b5 19. Qxd6 Rxd6 20. Nf4 Kf8 21. h4 Bd7 22. Kf2 Ne8 23. Rc1 Rc8 24. a3 Nc7 25. Nce2 Rb6 26. Rc5 Ne6 27. Nxe6+ Bxe6 28. Rec1 Ke8 29. Nf4 Kd8 30. b4 Ra8 31. h5 Rd6 32. Be2 g5 33. Nd3 {1-0 (33) Kasparov,G (2812)-Karpov,A (2619) Valencia 2009}) (6... Nf6 {this doesn't take advantage of the 3...Be7 move order, white has a good verison of a carlsbad position with the Bf4 actively placed.} 7. Bd3 O-O 8. Qc2 $1 {\/ ...Nh5, white should remember to preserve the Bf4} (8. h3 $5) (8. Nge2 Nh5 $5) (8. Nf3 Nh5 $5) 8... Nbd7 9. Nge2 $14 (9. Nf3 $14)) 7. g4 $5 {this move, first introduced by Botvinnik in his 1963 WCH match against Petrosian, grabs space on the kingside and asks black's Bf5 where it'd like to go. Black has a couple reasonable retreats} (7. Nge2) ( 7. Bd3) 7... Be6 {this is black's more reliable approach, retreating the bishop from it's active diagonal to a secure square.} ({if the bishop maintains it's active diagonal} 7... Bg6 {it will continue to be targeted with} 8. h4 $1 $14 {this pawn is immune from capture and causes black some problems, thus this line has fallen out of fashion at the higher levels.} Bxh4 $140 $2 ( 8... h5 9. g5 {white's space on the kingside makes black's development task more difficult and their h pawn a potential weakness after Ng1-e2-g3 / f4} Bd6 10. Nge2 Na6 (10... Ne7 {is part of the idea behind ...Bd6 but} 11. Qb3 $1 $14 {black doesn't have ...Qb6 at the moment and the defense of the b pawn is awkward}) 11. Bxd6 Qxd6 12. Nf4 Nc7 13. Be2 Qb4 14. Qd2 Ne7 15. Bf3 $14 { 1-0 (57) Karpov,A (2750)-Portisch,L (2610) Linares 1989}) (8... h6 {this is solid but allows white to grab more space and secure the f5 square with} 9. h5 Bh7 10. Bd3 {here white exchanges lightsquared bishops, with the intention of occupying f5 with a knight} Bxd3 ({on} 10... Nf6 11. Bxh7 Nxh7 12. Qb3 $1 { is a nice manuver, designed to have black occupy b6 so that they wont have ... Nb8-d7-b6-c4} Qb6 13. Qc2 $1 {[%cal Rb8d7,Rd7b6,Rb6c4,Yc2b3,Yb3c2,Yd1b3] and now white can play to bring their knight to f5 with less counterplay}) 11. Qxd3 Nf6 12. f3 Bd6 ({alternatives are no better} 12... Qb6 13. Nge2 Na6 14. O-O-O $16 c5 15. Be5 cxd4 16. Bxd4 Qc6 17. Kb1 Nc7 18. Qf5 Rd8 19. Nf4 O-O 20. g5 Nfe8 21. gxh6 Qxh6 22. Ncxd5 Bd6 23. Rdg1 Ne6 24. Ng6 Nxd4 25. exd4 b6 26. Rh3 Qh7 27. Ka1 Qh6 28. f4 Nc7 29. Nf6+ gxf6 30. Ne5+ Kh8 31. Rg6 fxg6 32. hxg6 fxe5 33. Rxh6+ Kg8 34. Qh3 exf4 35. Rh8+ Kg7 36. Qh6+ {1-0 (36) Dreev,A (2633) -Miralles,G (2490) France 2008}) (12... Nbd7 13. Nge2 Nf8 14. Ng3 Ne6 15. Nf5 $14) (12... O-O $6 13. g5 $16) 13. Nge2 Bxf4 14. Nxf4 (14. exf4 $5 {with the idea to bring the Ne2 to f5 is also strong}) 14... Qd6 (14... Nbd7 15. O-O-O Qe7 16. Nce2 O-O-O 17. Ng3 Ne8 18. Nf5 $14 {1/2-1/2 (48) Jojua,D (2571) -Managadze,N (2458) Ureki 2014}) 15. O-O-O Nbd7 16. Nce2 O-O-O 17. Ng3 Rhe8 18. Nf5 $14 {white's knight accomplished it's mission and white's kingside advantage secures white the better prospects 1-0 (38) Vitiugov,N (2722)-Zhou,J (2668) Ningbo 2010}) 9. Qb3 $1 b6 10. Rxh4 $1 Qxh4 11. Nxd5 $1) 8. h4 $5 { White goes ahead and grabs space anyhow, making black's development less comfortable, hinting at a possible kingside attack in the future, and offering a pawn to throw black off balance a bit.} (8. h3 {was played in the early days of the line, a little later geller's plan was a good solution discovered for the defender.} Nf6 (8... h5 $5 {equalizes} 9. gxh5 Nd7 10. Be2 Ndf6 11. a3 Nh6 $13 {0-1 (30) Galliamova,A (2400)-Geller,E (2525) Aruba 1992 CBM 033 [Ftacnik, L]}) 9. Bd3 c5 10. Nf3 Nc6 11. Kf1 O-O 12. Kg2 cxd4 13. Nxd4 Nxd4 14. exd4 { 1-0 (57) Botvinnik,M-Petrosian,T Moscow 1963}) 8... Nd7 {this is blacks best, keeping flexible, and asking white what they plan to do with the h pawn.} (8... Bxh4 $5 {should black accept the pawn the black pieces become a bit awkward, relying on eachother for their safety} 9. Qb3 $1 {this takes advantage of black's situation attacking the b pawn while it's difficult to defend} g5 $1 { defending the Bh4 with a tempo to free the queen, this is black's only good defense} ({other moves are worse, a good example was} 9... b6 10. Nf3 Be7 11. Ne5 Nf6 {when white had the strike} 12. g5 Nfd7 13. g6 $1 {1-0 (33) Gulko,B (2615)-Lputian,S (2590) Glendale 1994}) 10. Be5 (10. Bh2 $11 Qb6 (10... Bxg4 $6 11. Qxb7 Qe7 $2 12. Qxa8 Qxe3+ 13. Be2 Qxf2+ 14. Kd2 $1 {1-0 (25) Vaisser,A (2490)-Diaz,J (2410) Havana 1985}) 11. Nf3 Qxb3 12. axb3 Bxg4 13. Nxh4 gxh4 { 1/2-1/2 (13) Yudasin,L (2500)-Vaisser,A (2485) Trnava 1983}) 10... f6 11. Bh2 Bxg4 12. Be2 $1 (12. Qxb7 {only leads to a complicated draw} Qe7 13. Qxa8 (13. Qxe7+ $6 {0-1 (47) Giri,A (2785)-So,W (2815) chess.com INT 2017}) 13... Qxe3+ 14. Be2 Bxf2+ 15. Kf1 Bh4 16. Qxb8+ Kf7 17. Nd1 Bxe2+ 18. Nxe2 Qf3+ 19. Kg1 Qxe2 20. Bg3 Qg4 21. Kg2 Qxd4 (21... Qe4+ $1) 22. Kh2 Ne7 23. Qxh8 Bxg3+ 24. Kxg3 {1/2-1/2 (24) Vaisser,A (2490)-Geller,E (2565) Sochi 1982}) 12... Bxe2 13. Qxb7 $1 Nd7 14. Kxe2 $1 Qc8 15. Qxc8+ Rxc8 16. Nf3 {this is the point of white's play, black will have an extra pawn, but it will be doubled, isolated, and not the focus of the position.} Ne7 17. Nxh4 gxh4 18. Rac1 $14 {and here it was black who needed to defend accurtely dispite being up a pawn as their structure is in shambles and their pieces have no clear prospects. 1-0 (45) Wojtaszek,R (2746)-Doettling,F (2588) Montpellier 2015}) (8... c5 $6 9. Nb5 $16 ) (8... h5 {this stops white's pawns but white grabs useful space and it's not easy for black to finish getting the pieces out.} 9. g5 {and now for example... } Bd6 10. Nge2 Ne7 11. Qb3 $1 $14 {and the b pawn is awkward to defend as in: 1-0 (24) Botvinnik,M-Balashov,Y Moscow 1970}) (8... h6 {make's black's king a little shakier as it won't be as happy castling with a hook on the kingside} 9. Bd3 Nd7 10. h5 Nb6 11. f3 Bd6 12. Nge2 Qe7 13. Kf2 $5 (13. Qd2 $5) 13... Nf6 14. Bxd6 Qxd6 15. Qg1 O-O-O 16. Qg3 Ne8 17. Rab1 $14 {1/2-1/2 (42) Potkin,V (2621)-Oparin,G (2552) Vladivostok 2014}) (8... Bd6 {can be met with the unusual development scheme} 9. Nh3 $5 Ne7 10. Bd3 h6 11. Qf3 $5 $14 {with a good position for white in 1-0 (41) Yakovich,Y (2580)-Arlandi,E (2448) Saint Vincent 2000}) (8... Nf6 {in unstable, running into} 9. g5 $1 Ne4 10. Bd3 $5 Qa5 11. Qb3 $1 $16 b5 12. Nf3 (12. Nge2) 12... Nd7 13. O-O O-O 14. Qc2 f5 15. gxf6 Ndxf6 16. Ng5 Nxg5 $2 17. hxg5 $18 {1-0 (35) Miles,A (2565)-Upton,T (2295) Manchester 1982}) (8... Nh6 9. g5 $1 {is also good for white} Nf5 10. Bd3 Nd7 11. Qc2 g6 {0-1 (31) Foisor,S (2375)-Batsiashvili,N (2304) Plovdiv 2008} 12. Nge2 $14) 9. g5 $5 {white takes more space, restricting the Nf8, preventing ... Bxh4.} (9. h5 $5 {to grab more space is also interesting, but black has a good defensive resourse in ...Nh6!? intending a timely ...g5, and if not captured .. .f5 to follow} Nh6 $5 (9... Ngf6 10. f3 h6 11. Bd3 Nb6 12. Nge2 Bd6 13. Qc2 Qe7 14. O-O-O $14 {1-0 (53) Wojtaszek,R (2710)-Oparin,G (2478) Jurmala 2013}) (9... Qb6 10. Rb1 Ngf6 11. f3 h6 12. Bd3 c5 (12... Qa5 13. Nge2 $14 {1/2-1/2 (25) Botvinnik,M-Spassky,B Leiden 1970}) 13. Nge2 Rc8 14. Kf1 O-O 15. g5 $1 hxg5 16. Bxg5 Rfe8 (16... Ng4 17. Bf4) 17. Qe1 cxd4 18. exd4 $1 $36 (18. Nxd4 $14) 18... Nh7 19. Bxe7 Rxe7 20. Qg3 Ndf8 21. Kf2 f6 22. Bc2 Bf7 23. Bb3 Rce8 24. Rbd1 Ng5 25. Nf4 Qd6 26. Rd3 b5 27. Qg4 Rd7 28. h6 g6 29. Ncxd5 a5 30. h7+ Ngxh7 31. Nxg6 {1-0 (31) Knaak,R (2495)-Geller,E (2575) Moscow 1982} Nxg6 32. Ne7+ $1) 10. Be2 Nb6 11. Nh3 $5 (11. Rc1 Bd6 (11... f5 $5) (11... Nc4 $5 12. Bxc4 dxc4 13. Bxh6 gxh6 $13 {1/2-1/2 (39) Mueller,K (2453)-Daurelle,H (2209) IECG email 2001}) 12. Nh3 Bxf4 13. Nxf4 Bd7 14. Rg1 g5 $1 {1/2-1/2 (44) Kasparov,G (2700) -Karpov,A (2720) Moscow 1985}) 11... g5 $1 12. hxg6 hxg6 13. Be5 $5 (13. f3 Bh4+ 14. Nf2 g5 $1 15. Bh2 Qe7 16. Qc2 f5 $1 $15 {0-1 (30) Onischuk,A (2658) -Lputian,S (2607) Poikovsky 2001 CBM 084 [Dautov]}) (13. a4 $5 {1/2-1/2 (30) Fier,A (2579)-Bacrot,E (2715) Tbilisi 2017}) 13... f6 14. Nf4 fxe5 15. Nxg6 $13 {1/2-1/2 (34) Mamedyarov,S (2764)-Nakamura,H (2764) Tashkent 2014 CBM 163 [Krasenkow,M]}) 9... h6 {black must challenge white's space in order to get their pieces developed} 10. g6 $1 {a key move, and the point of white's play, sacrificing a pawn for the initiative} Ngf6 {it is best for black to decline the offer and get on with development} (10... fxg6 $6 11. Bd3 {white has sacrificed a pawn, in return black's development and ability to castle are stifeled, and as it turn out, it isn't too difficult to get the pawn back} Bf7 (11... Ngf6 $6 12. Bxg6+ Bf7 13. Bxf7+ Kxf7 14. Nf3 Rf8 15. Rg1 h5 $2 16. Ng5+ Ke8 17. Ne6 Qb6 18. Qc2 Ne4 19. Nxe4 dxe4 20. O-O-O Nf6 21. Rxg7 Rc8 22. Nxf8 Bxf8 23. Rg5 Be7 24. Kb1 Nd5 25. Re5 Qb5 26. Bg5 {1-0 (26) Ponomariov,R (2743) -Sargissian,G (2671) Khanty-Mansiysk 2013}) (11... Nf8 12. Qc2 $1 Bf6 (12... Bf7 13. Nf3 Bd6 14. Ne5 Ne7 15. O-O-O Ne6 16. Bxg6 Bxg6 17. Nxg6 Nxg6 18. Qxg6+ Ke7 19. Bxd6+ Qxd6 20. e4 $1 $16 {1/2-1/2 (29) Hribar,B (2233)-Mejak,S (2192) Slovenia 2014}) (12... Nf6 13. Nf3 Qc8 14. Ne5 Bf5 15. Nxg6 Bxd3 16. Qxd3 Nxg6 17. Qxg6+ Kd8 18. O-O-O Qe6 19. Be5 Kd7 20. f3 Raf8 21. Ne2 Kc8 22. Nf4 Qf7 23. Qc2 Rhg8 24. Ng6 Re8 25. Qf5+ Kd8 26. Bh2 Bb4 27. Qf4 $18 {1-0 (41) Artemiev,V (2499)-Oparin,G (2496) Loo 2013}) (12... g5 13. hxg5 Bxg5 14. Bg3 Bf6 15. Nge2 h5 16. O-O-O h4 17. e4 $1 $16 {1-0 (33) Brodsky,M (2558)-Jojua,D (2507) Cappelle-la-Grande 2012}) 13. O-O-O Ne7 14. Nge2 Bf5 15. e4 dxe4 16. Nxe4 Bxe4 17. Bxe4 Nd5 18. Bg3 Qa5 19. Bxd5 cxd5 20. Kb1 Kf7 21. Nf4 h5 22. Rhe1 Rh6 23. Qb3 Rd8 24. Qxb7+ Rd7 25. Qb3 g5 26. hxg5 Bxg5 27. Nxh5 Rb6 28. Qc2 Ne6 29. Rxe6 Kxe6 30. Qg6+ Bf6 31. Qe8+ Re7 32. Nf4+ Kd6 33. Ng6+ Ke6 34. Nf8+ Kf5 35. Qg6# {1-0 (35) Peralta,F (2591)-Barsov,A (2514) Catalunya 2012}) 12. Qc2 Ngf6 ( 12... g5 13. hxg5 Bxg5 14. Bg3 Ne7 15. Nf3 Bf6 16. O-O-O c5 17. Kb1 c4 18. Bf5 O-O 19. Rdg1 Qe8 20. Bf4 Nxf5 21. Qxf5 Be6 22. Qc2 Bg5 23. Rxg5 hxg5 24. Qh7+ Kf7 25. Nxg5+ Kf6 26. e4 {1-0 (26) Tomashevsky,E (2711)-Aghasaryan,R (2503) Yerevan 2014}) 13. Bxg6 (13. Nge2 $5) (13. O-O-O $5) 13... O-O 14. Nge2 Nh5 15. O-O-O Qe8 (15... Bxg6 16. Qxg6 Qe8) 16. Bh7+ Kh8 17. Rdg1 {1/2-1/2 (29) Savina, A (2389)-Batsiashvili,N (2408) Loo 2014}) 11. gxf7+ (11. Bd3 O-O $13) 11... Bxf7 12. Bd3 {this is an important tabiya, white has good chances to fight for advantage thanks to their center, the activity on the kingside, and black's less than ideal king safety.} -- (12... O-O 13. Qf3 $1 {this is a useful resourse, bringing the queen into play before playing Nge2 and 0-0-0, with it will be able to put some pressure on the black kingside} Qb6 14. O-O-O (14. Nge2 $1) 14... c5 $6 (14... Bh5 $5 15. Qg2 $13) 15. Nge2 Rac8 16. Rhg1 $16 { 1-0 (75) Nepomniachtchi,I (2721)-Aronian,L (2803) Beijing 2013}) (12... Ne4 13. Bxe4 $1 {this is simple and good} (13. Nxe4 dxe4 14. Bxe4 Nf6 15. Bf3 O-O 16. Ne2 {1-0 (81) Ponomariov,R (2743)-Riazantsev,A (2708) Khanty-Mansiysk 2013} Nd5 17. Be5 Bxh4 $13) 13... dxe4 14. Nge2 O-O 15. Qc2 Nf6 16. Rg1 Kh8 17. Be5 $14 { and white was corraling the e pawn in 1-0 (33) Nepomniachtchi,I (2717) -Ponomariov,R (2756) Riga 2013}) (12... Nh5 $5 {is black's most fighting defense, attacking the h pawn and the Bf4 sharpening the game. white's compensattion for the pawn looks very reasonable, with the strong center, active pieces, and rather exposed black king white can often drum up an initiative} 13. Bh2 O-O (13... Bxh4 14. Nf3 (14. Qe2 $5 Be7 15. O-O-O Nhf6 16. Nf3 $44) 14... O-O 15. Qe2 Be6 16. Bd6 Bg4 (16... Be7 17. Bxe7 Qxe7 18. Nh4 Qg5 19. Qc2 Bg4 20. Bh7+ Kf7 21. Kd2 $1) 17. Bxf8 Qf6 18. Bd6 Bxf3 19. Be7 $1 Qf7 20. Bg6 $16) 14. Qg4 $5 {a noteworthy queen sortie to the kingside} Ndf6 15. Qg2 Bb4 $6 (15... Be6 $5 16. Nge2 Ng4 17. Bg1 $44 Bd6 18. f3 Ngf6 19. O-O-O Qd7 20. Kb1 b5 21. Bh2 {or e4!?} Bxh2 22. Qxh2 a5 23. Rhg1 {1/2-1/2 (24) Gleichmann,M (2528)-Efendiyev,E (2530) ICCF email 2012}) 16. Nge2 $14 Ne4 $6 17. Be5 Nxf2 $6 18. Qxf2 Bg6 19. Qxf8+ Qxf8 20. Bxg6 $18 Nf6 21. Rf1 Bd6 22. Kd2 Qe7 23. Bxf6 gxf6 24. Rf3 Rf8 25. Raf1 Kh8 26. h5 b5 27. Nf4 Bxf4 28. Rxf4 a5 29. Bc2 a4 30. a3 Qd6 31. Na2 c5 32. dxc5 Qxc5 33. Rxf6 Rxf6 34. Rxf6 d4 35. Rxh6+ Kg7 36. Rg6+ Kf7 37. exd4 Qxd4+ 38. Kc1 Qd5 39. Kb1 Qxh5 40. Rg1 Qc5 41. Re1 Kf6 42. Re4 Qg1+ 43. Nc1 Qc5 44. Bd3 Qd5 45. Rb4 {1-0 (45) Aczel,G (2553) -Tancik,K (2258) Palic 2017}) *

3...Nf6 Minor lines

A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)
[Event "5th, 6th, & 7th Move Alternatives"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Queen's Gambit Declined"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D36"] [Annotator "kestenberg,tal"] [PlyCount "16"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. cxd5 {The Exchange, or Carlsbad, variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined.} exd5 5. Bg5 {White determines the structure by capturing in the center. The arrising classical carslbad positions have been tested by the very best for a long time. White has a couple typical plans, the minority attack, and expansion in the center with f3 & e4, often drumming up a dangerous initiative after some preparation.} c6 {this is the most flexible move, supporting the center and hinting at a later ...Bf5. Black doesn't usually go without it, so playing it right away and keeping options open makes sense.} (5... Bf5 $2 {is premature} 6. Bxf6 $1 {and black is without a pleasant recapture} gxf6 $16 (6... Qxf6 7. Nxd5 $16)) (5... Bb4 {isn't particularly convincing as white can still develop with Nge2 to neutralize any pressure from the ...Bb4} 6. e3 Nbd7 (6... c5 {allows a check that white can make use of} 7. Bb5+ Bd7 8. Bxd7+ Nbxd7 9. Nge2 {white's structure is better} Qa5 10. Bxf6 $1 Nxf6 11. dxc5 $1 {and white got good play against the IQP in} O-O 12. O-O Rfd8 13. Qb3 Bxc5 14. Rad1 Qa6 15. Rd2 Rd7 16. Rfd1 $14 {1-0 (51) Granda Zuniga,J (2550)-Braga,F (2445) San Fernando 1991}) 7. Bd3 h6 8. Bh4 O-O 9. Nge2 Re8 10. O-O {it's unclear what the ...Bb4's purpose is} c6 11. Qc2 Nf8 12. a3 Be7 13. b4 a6 (13... b5 14. a4) 14. Na4 Ne4 15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. Nc5 Nd6 17. a4 Bg4 18. Nf4 $14 {1-0 (41) Keres,P-Lopez Arce,A Buenos Aires 1939}) ({ This is another mover order which usually transposes, but black could try to play without ...c6 for example} 5... Be7 {[%cal Rc7c6]} 6. e3 {so long as black saves ...c6 white is saving time on Qc2} O-O (6... Bf5 $6 {isn't good here, as black hasn't played ...c6} 7. Bxf6 Bxf6 8. Qb3 {after this thematic queen sortie black's pawns are under attack}) (6... Nbd7 {is is also possible for black to try to develop with ...Bf5 after preparing with a knight maneuver to g7, but it's rather long winded and white will be well prepared to meet it by the time it comes.} 7. Bd3 Nf8 8. Qc2 Ne6 9. Bh4 g6 {/\ ...Ng7 & ...Bf5} 10. Nge2 Ng7 11. f3 $14 {and now white can meet ...Bf5?! with e4!}) 7. Bd3 Nbd7 ({ though not played often it is possible for black to develop with ...Bb7, though their move order matters. white's set up will be similar to the main lines} 7... h6 8. Bh4 b6 9. Nge2 Bb7 10. O-O) ({an incorrect move order would be} 7... b6 $6 {which is refuted by} 8. Bxf6 $1 Bxf6 9. Qh5 $16 {with a threat to the d pawn and the king}) 8. Nge2 Re8 9. O-O $1 {[%csl Yc7,Yd1] whilte black "saved time" on ...c6 white did like wise with Qc2, and now if black should continue with} (9. Qc2) 9... Nf8 {playing without ...c6, now white can grab some extra space on the queenside with} (9... c6 10. Qc2) 10. b4 $1 a6 ({ the pawn is taboo on account of} 10... Bxb4 $140 11. Bxf6 gxf6 12. Nxd5 Qxd5 13. Qa4) (10... Ng6 11. b5 $1 Qd6 12. Nf4 Ng4 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Be2 Nf6 15. Qb3 Bf5 16. Rfc1 Rad8 17. a4 {1-0 (45) Gelfand,B (2738)-Dervishi,E (2538) Istanbul 2012}) 11. a3 c6 12. Qc2 g6 13. f3 Ne6 14. Bh4 Nh5 15. Bxe7 Rxe7 16. Qd2 b6 17. Rad1 Bb7 18. Bb1 Nhg7 19. e4 {1-0 (39) Kasparov,G (2805)-Short,N (2655) London 1993 CBM 036 [Ftacnik,L]}) (5... Nbd7 {also usually transposes, but it sets a little trap, and black could continue with the unique ...Bd6} 6. e3 (6. Nxd5 $2 {white should avoid this pitfall} Nxd5 $1 {black can break the pin, temporarily giving up the queen and getting it back as white's queen must be given in order to save her king} 7. Bxd8 Bb4+ $1 {the point} 8. Qd2 Bxd2+ 9. Kxd2 Kxd8 $19) 6... c6 (6... Be7 7. Bd3 O-O 8. Nge2 {is a transposition into other lines}) 7. Bd3 Bd6 $5 {this is something that black tries on occation with ...Nbd7, but black's activity isn't problematic and white's pin sometimes can be} (7... Be7 8. Qc2) 8. Nge2 O-O (8... Nf8 {is too slow here, as the central expansion} 9. f3 Ng6 10. e4 $14 {came with a threat to play e5 thanks to the ...Bd6 in 0-1 (39) Seirawan,Y (2610)-Ljubojevic,L (2580) Barcelona 1989 CBM 012 [Bulletin]}) 9. Qc2 {white can include this with a tempo here} ({ white must take a bit of care castling here as} 9. O-O $2 {blunders} Bxh2+ $1 10. Kxh2 Ng4+ $17) 9... h6 10. Bh4 Qc7 (10... Re8 11. h3 {intending to 0-0 without any ...Bxh2 tricks as in 1-0 (65) Short,N (2658)-Cote,J Gatineau 2011 makes the ...Bd6 questionable, Bg3 is also playable}) 11. Bg3 $5 $14 { intending 0-0 is simple and good} (11. O-O-O $13 {as in 1-0 (30) Topalov,V (2725)-Plaumann,D Frankfurt 1997 is double edged})) 6. Qc2 $5 {This move order, aimed against ...Bf5, is simplest.} (6. e3 {this allows some additional option for the defender, which move you prefer is a matter of taste} {the most serious alternative is...} Bf5 $5 {when white must act before black easily completes development with} (6... Qb6 {is one additional, but not too convincing option} 7. Qc2 (7. Bxf6 Qxb2 8. Qc1 Qxc1+ 9. Rxc1 gxf6 10. Nxd5 { 1/2-1/2 (41) Kortschnoj,V-Prins,L The Hague 1962} Ba3 $1) 7... Ne4 8. Bf4 Bf5 9. Bd3 Na6 10. a3 Qa5 11. Qa4 (11. Ra2 $5) 11... Qxa4 12. Nxa4 {1-0 (41) Kramnik,V (2490)-Costa,J (2410) Maringa 1991}) 7. Qf3 $1 Bg6 8. Bxf6 Qxf6 9. Qxf6 gxf6 {and the resulting position, though perhaps slightly favorable for white, is not easy to crack and has amassed a lot of theory.}) 6... Be7 { breaking the pin and preparing to castle, this is the most logical and typical development.However, Black's moves are generally interchangeable in the early phase of this opening, and there are some transpositional possibilities, and a few sidelines} (6... Nbd7 {will likely transpose into other lines} 7. e3 Be7 ( 7... Bd6 8. Bd3) 8. Bd3) (6... Bd6 {also probably transposes to the note on 5.. .Nbd7} 7. e3 O-O 8. Bd3 h6 9. Bh4 Re8 10. Nge2 (10. Nf3 Be6 11. Ne5 c5 { 1/2-1/2 (59) Nakamura,H (2787)-Kramnik,V (2812) Paris 2016}) 10... Nbd7) (6... Na6 $5 {is black's try to take adavntage of the Qc2 move order, but it is not too troublesome.} 7. e3 $1 {it is best to let black play...} (7. a3 {would conceed time to black allowing them to quickly redeploy the ...Na6} Nc7 8. e3 Ne6) 7... Nb4 8. Qb1 $1 {a precise small finesse, white prevents the direct ... Bf5, looking to provoke ...g6 which would loosen the Nf6} ({understanding the alternatives helps} 8. Qd2 Bf5 {wasn't easy for white in ½-½ (22) Kasparov,G (2812)-Ivanchuk,V (2714) Wijk aan Zee 1999 CBM 069 [Hansen,Cu]}) (8. Qd1 Bf5 9. Rc1 Qa5 {gave black surprising counterplay in ½-½ (27) Ehlvest,J (2615) -Short,N (2685) Manila 1992}) 8... g6 9. Qd1 $1 {[%cal Gg5d8] only now Qd1, the point is that black no longer can play actively with the queen as it is tied down to f6 at the moment} a5 (9... Bf5 10. Rc1 {and white is ready to play a3 and chase back black's cavalery} h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. a3 Na6 13. Bxa6 bxa6 14. Qa4 $16 {1-0 (52) Baburin,A (2545)-Repkova,E (2328) Triesen 2007}) 10. a3 Na6 11. Bd3 $14 {and white was better because black's opening adventure didnt amount to much in ½-½ (66) Dreev,A (2667)-Lu,S (2556) China 2014}) ( 6... g6 {to prepare ...Bf5 is too slow} 7. e3 Bf5 8. Qb3 $1 $14 {is uncomfortable for black}) 7. e3 Nbd7 (7... O-O 8. Bd3 h6 $5 {other decent moves here should just be transpositions. with this black maybe trying to organize simplifications with a quick ...Re8 & ...Ne4, but dispite simplifying black doesn't completely equalize} (8... Nbd7 {is transpositional}) 9. Bh4 Re8 (9... Nbd7) 10. Nge2 Ne4 (10... Nh5 11. Bxe7 Qxe7 {1-0 (67) Caruana,F (2799) -Kramnik,V (2803) Douglas 2017}) 11. Bxe7 Qxe7 12. Bxe4 $1 dxe4 13. Ng3 f5 14. O-O Na6 15. a3 Nc7 16. f3 {1-0 (37) Carlsen,M (2710)-Carlsen,H (2089) Tromsoe 2007}) ({part of the idea behind Qc2 is to prevent simplification with ...} 7... Ne4 $6 {which fails on account of} 8. Bxe7 $1 Qxe7 $2 (8... Kxe7 $16) 9. Nxd5 $1 cxd5 10. Qxc8+ Qd8 11. Bb5+ Nc6 12. Bxc6+ (12. Qxb7) 12... bxc6 13. Qxc6+ {1-0 (13) Kotov,A-Petrosian,T Moscow 1949}) (7... Bg4 {attacking into thin air is a bit strange} 8. Bd3 Nbd7 9. h3 $5 {giving white a tempo for} Be6 10. Bf4 $5 $14 {Gives white a pleasant carlsbad with an active Bf4 and it's unclear what black has in return 1-0 (44) Reshevsky,S-Gligoric,S New York 1952} ) (7... Na6 {is no longer good} 8. Bxa6 bxa6 $16) 8. Bd3 {now we're approaching the main lines.} -- (8... O-O) (8... Nh5) *

3...Nf6 with 8...Nh5

Games
[Event "Main Line with 8...Nh5"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Queen's Gambit Declined"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D36"] [Annotator "kestenberg,tal"] [PlyCount "24"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 c6 6. e3 Be7 7. Bd3 Nbd7 8. Qc2 Nh5 $5 {This has become a main line nowadays, with ...Nh5 black accepts a somewhat passive position in order to simplify. Black's position is extremely solid and tough to crack but white has a few reasonable plans and can often maintain a small edge thanks to their somewhat more active bishop and play.} ( 8... Nf8 {a sideline, black intends ...Nf8-e6-g7 with ...g6 to prepare ...Bf5, but it is a bit slow} 9. Nge2 Ne6 10. Bh4 g6 {black intends ...Ng7 & ...Bf5} 11. O-O O-O (11... Ng7 {would be well met} 12. f3 {with the idea} Bf5 $6 13. e4 $1) 12. Rae1 (12. Rab1 $5 {is also interesting} Ng7 13. b4 {or f3 nonetheless}) 12... Nh5 {black isn't in time for ...Ng7 so they revert back to ...Nh5} (12... Ng7 13. f3 Bf5 $140 $6 14. e4) 13. Bxe7 Qxe7 14. f3 {and it looks easier to play white as in the ...Nh5 lines 1-0 (40) Petrosian,T-Zinser,S Venice 1967}) 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 {white has several plans here, with Nf3, Nge2, 0-0, or 0-0-0, and they all contain their fair share of venom.} 10. Nge2 $5 g6 {typically black intends play ...g6 ...Ng7 & ...Bf5 to deal with white on the kingside and ... Nb6 to slow down the queenside play.} 11. O-O (11. O-O-O {has also been tested, and can be more double edged. White has some attacking plans as you'll see in the example game i'll include, but black also has reasonable defensive resources} Nb6 12. Ng3 Ng7 13. Kb1 Bd7 14. Rc1 O-O-O 15. Na4 $5 {this old attacking plan was played by some great players, white exchanges off black's defensive knight and plans to lift the heavy pieces over to the queenside, black is solid enough and fine should they proceed with care} Nxa4 16. Qxa4 Kb8 17. Rc3 $5 {preparing Rhc1 or possibly Ra3} b6 18. Ba6 (18. Ra3 Be8 19. Qc2 Rc8 20. Rc1 Bd7 21. Qd2 h5 22. Rb3 Ne6 23. Rbc3 h4 24. Ne2 Qd6 25. h3 Rhd8 26. Ng1 g5 27. Nf3 f6 $11 {1-0 (85) Timman,J (2635)-Short,N (2655) El Escorial 1993 Candidates [Ftacnik,L]}) (18. Rhc1) 18... Ne6 19. Rhc1 Rhe8 20. Qb3 Qd6 21. Nf1 Ka8 22. Nd2 Nc7 23. Bf1 Ne6 (23... Qxh2 $13) 24. g3 Rc8 25. Bg2 $14 Rc7 26. h4 Rd8 27. Nf3 Bc8 28. Qa4 c5 29. Ng5 Nxg5 30. hxg5 Bb7 31. dxc5 bxc5 32. Qf4 Qxf4 33. gxf4 $16 d4 34. Rxc5 Rxc5 35. Bxb7+ Kxb7 36. Rxc5 dxe3 37. fxe3 Re8 $2 38. Re5 $1 $18 Rxe5 39. fxe5 Kc6 40. Kc2 Kd5 41. b4 Kxe5 42. a4 f6 43. gxf6 Kxf6 44. b5 {1-0 (44) Kasparov,G (2760)-Andersson,U (2625) Reykjavik 1988}) 11... O-O 12. Rab1 $5 {this looks to me to be the most testing. white prepares a minority attack with b4-b5, should black play ...a5 preventing white's plans they can revert back to the plan with Rbe1 and Nc1 intending f3 & e4.} (12. Rae1 {is a playable alternative} Ndf6 13. Nc1 $5 {this is the main idea behind the line, white prepares to expand in the center with f3 and e4 and the knight can go to b3 where it will find prospects on the queenside} Ng7 14. f3 c5 $5 15. dxc5 Qxc5 16. Nb3 {now white can revert to playing against the IQP} Qb6 17. Nd4 (17. Qf2 Ne6 18. Qh4 Qd8 19. Rd1 Bd7 20. Rf2 Bc6 21. e4 dxe4 22. Bxe4 Qe7 23. Bxc6 bxc6 24. Ne4 Nd5 25. Qxe7 Nxe7 {1-0 (38) Kruppa,Y (2582)-Kosyrev,V (2512) Elista 2000 CBM 079 [Baburin]}) 17... Ne6 18. Qf2 {1/2-1/2 (43) Wojtaszek,R (2735)-Wang,Y (2718) Tromsoe 2014}) 12... -- ({if white isn't prevented from playing b4 they get good play on the queenside with their minority attack} 12... Nb6 13. b4 $1 a6 14. a4 Be6 15. Rfc1 Rfc8 16. a5 Nd7 17. Na4 Ng7 18. Nc5 Nxc5 19. bxc5 Bf5 20. Rb6 Rc7 21. Rcb1 Rd8 22. Bxf5 Nxf5 23. R1b3 Rdd7 24. Qb1 Ng7 25. Nf4 Ne6 26. Nd3 f6 27. h4 Qg7 28. Qd1 Qh6 29. Qg4 Kf7 30. g3 Re7 31. Kg2 Red7 32. Rb1 Re7 33. Rh1 Qh5 34. Qxh5 gxh5 35. Rhb1 Kg7 36. R6b4 Nf8 37. f3 Ng6 38. e4 dxe4 39. fxe4 Rcd7 40. Nf2 Kf8 41. Kf3 {1-0 (42) Akobian,V (2618)-Bryant,J (2409) Orange 2015}) (12... Ndf6 13. b4 $1 Bd7 (13... a6 14. a4) 14. b5 $14 Qd6 15. bxc6 Ng4 16. g3 bxc6 17. Na4 Rfe8 18. Nc5 { 1/2-1/2 (26) Byrne,R-Guimard,C Buenos Aires 1964}) (12... Ng7 13. b4 a6 14. a4 Nb6 15. a5 Nd7 16. Na4 $14 {1-0 (43) Korobov,A (2700)-Inarkiev,E (2660) Berlin 2015}) (12... f5 13. b4 f4 14. Nxf4 Nxf4 15. exf4 Rxf4 16. b5 $14) (12... a5 $5 {this looks best, aimed against b4} 13. -- (13. Rbe1 $5 {this is top player GM Korobovs choice, switching back to the central plan} Nb6 (13... Ndf6 14. Nc1 Ng7 15. f3 c5 16. dxc5 Qxc5 17. Nb3 Qb6 18. Nd4 $14 {1-0 (59) Korobov,A (2709) -Luch,M (2449) Czech Republic 2015}) 14. Nc1 Ng7 15. f3 Bf5 16. e4 dxe4 17. fxe4 Be6 18. Qf2 f5 19. exf5 Nxf5 20. Nb3 Ng7 21. Qe3 Rxf1+ 22. Rxf1 Re8 23. Nc5 Bf5 {1/2-1/2 (23) Korobov,A (2711)-Yilmaz,M (2630) Khanty-Mansiysk 2017}) ( 13. Na4 $5 {and}) (13. a3 $5 {are playable alternatives})) *

3...Nf6 with 8...0-0 The Main Line

A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)
[Event "Main Line with 8...0-0"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Queen's Gambit Declined"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D36"] [Annotator "kestenberg,tal"] [PlyCount "22"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 c6 6. e3 Be7 7. Bd3 Nbd7 8. Qc2 O-O 9. Nge2 $5 {a flexible option, this modest looking development is more poisonous than first meets the eye. white is able to play the standard minority attack but also keeps the option to advance their center} (9. Nf3 { is the perfectly playable alternative}) 9... Re8 10. O-O (10. O-O-O $132 { is double edged and allows more counterplay}) 10... Nf8 {this is by far black's most popular plan to complete development.} ({black has a couple alternatives to try to simplify} 10... h6 {black intends ...Ne4 forcing exchanges after Bh4, but white can make use of a tactical trick to play} 11. Bf4 $1 {avoiding trades and putting the bishop on an active diagonal} (11. Bh4 {would allow simplification but is still acceptable for white} Ne4 12. Bxe7 Qxe7 13. Rae1 Ndf6 14. f3 Nxc3 15. Nxc3 {1-0 (36) Dautov,R (2610)-Gerstner,W (2405) Buehl 1992}) 11... Nh5 $140 $2 {trying to hunt down the bishop blunders the shot} 12. Nxd5 {which traps the queen after} cxd5 $4 ({or ends up a pawn down for nothing} 12... Nxf4 13. Nxe7+) 13. Bc7) (10... Ne4 {right away can also be answered} 11. Bf4 $1 {and white is threatening Nxd5} (11. Bxe7 Qxe7) 11... Ndf6 (11... f5 $2 {would hang the queen trapping idea} 12. Nxd5 $1 { /\ Bc7}) 12. Nxe4 dxe4 13. Bxe4 $16 {1-0 (22) Salov,V (2670)-Torres Gonzalez,J (2215) Villarrobledo 1998}) 11. f3 $1 {the start of a central strategy, white's plan is to play e4 after some preparation. Should white accomplish the break their mobile center can become very dangerous. Black often tries to take advantage of white's weakened e3 pawn with a ...c5 strike of their own, but it must be well timed or else white may simply end up with good play against the IQP. Black has tried a few plans here.} ({this plan was first introduced by WCH Botvinnik, though not in the modern move order, and his games are good to follow...} 11. Rab1 Bd6 12. Kh1 $1 Ng6 13. f3 $1 Be7 14. Rbe1 Nd7 15. Bxe7 Rxe7 16. Ng3 Nf6 17. Qf2 Be6 18. Nf5 Bxf5 19. Bxf5 Qb6 20. e4 $1 dxe4 21. fxe4 Rd8 22. e5 $1 Nd5 23. Ne4 Nf8 24. Nd6 $1 Qc7 25. Be4 Ne6 26. Qh4 g6 27. Bxd5 cxd5 28. Rc1 Qd7 29. Rc3 Rf8 30. Nf5 $1 Rfe8 31. Nh6+ Kf8 32. Qf6 Ng7 33. Rcf3 Rc8 34. Nxf7 Re6 35. Qg5 Nf5 36. Nh6 Qg7 37. g4 {1-0 (37) Botvinnik,M-Keres,P Moscow 1952}) 11... -- (11... g6 {this is a bit slow} 12. Rad1 Ne6 13. Bh4 Nh5 {black reverts to a familiar plan to exchange darksquare bishops, but as usual whites peices keep the more active prospects, and an e4 break looms} ({now black isnt in time for} 13... Ng7 {/\ ...Bf5 as in ½-½ (21) Kasparov,G (2800)-Rodriguez Miguens,D Galicia 1991 because white is ready for} 14. e4 $1) (13... b6 {the double fianchetto is also time consuming and white will be ble to get in their central break} 14. Qc1 Bb7 15. e4 Nh5 16. Bf2 Bg5 17. Be3 Bxe3+ 18. Qxe3 $14 {1-0 (45) Caruana,F (2813)-Houska,J (2386) Douglas 2016}) 14. Bxe7 (14. Bf2 {1/2-1/2 (31) Kotov,A-Stahlberg,G Saltsjobaden 1952}) 14... Qxe7 15. Qd2 Qg5 16. e4 $1 Qxd2 17. Rxd2 $14 { and white went on to convert their advantage in 1-0 (52) Sasikiran,K (2700) -Maheswaran,P (2292) Panaji 2012}) (11... h6 {doesn't achieve much either} 12. Bh4 Ne6 13. Kh1 b6 (13... c5 14. dxc5 Nxc5 15. Bb5 $14 {1-0 (32) Vaisser,A (2490)-King,D (2470) Frunze 1987}) 14. Rad1 Bb7 15. e4 {this may have been premature here} ({white could have played this very shortly after the preparatory} 15. Bf2 $5 {e.g.} a6 16. e4 Kh8 17. e5 Nd7 18. f4 {1-0 (36) Aleksandrov,A (2638)-Dhar,M (2022) Dubai 2011}) ({or} 15. Bf5 $5) 15... dxe4 16. fxe4 Ng4 $5 {white should be aware of this resourse} 17. Bf2 Nxf2+ 18. Rxf2 Nxd4 19. Nxd4 Qxd4 20. Ba6 (20. Qe2 $5) 20... Qxf2 21. Qxf2 Bxa6 $13 {1/2-1/2 (38) Lautier,J (2450)-Spassky,B (2580) Cannes 1989}) (11... Nh5 {the typical simplifying maneuver, black is willing to accept a slightly passive position to exchange a set of pieces and ease some of the pressure in the position. as often happens white is left with more active pieces, and in this case is quick to get in e4 with play in the center} 12. Bxe7 Qxe7 {allows the very direct} ( 12... Rxe7 {this keeps the queen eyeing d4, putting a bit more resistance against white's e4 break, but it will come with due build up} 13. Qd2 { preparations...} ({a bit too early was} 13. e4 dxe4 14. fxe4 {in ½-½ (44) Kasparov,G (2800)-Bellemo,L Asiag 1991 as things are not so clear after} Ne6 $13) 13... Ne6 14. Rad1 g6 15. Bb1 (15. b4 $5 $14 {was an interesting oppertunity for white, taking advantage of the rook's recapture to switch plans and go for the minority attack}) 15... b5 16. a3 {white takes a bit more time out to prevent the opponent's counterplay} a5 17. b4 (17. Nc1 $5) 17... axb4 18. axb4 Qd6 19. e4 $1 {and white manages to get the central play in with the usual pull ½-½ (33) Gelfand,B (2685)-Kamsky,G (2655) Tilburg 1992}) 13. e4 $1 {black's pieces are not in place to create any counterplay and thus white can play this with out further delay} dxe4 (13... Be6 14. e5 $14) 14. fxe4 {i'll include some example comtinuations, but white's advantage is clear} Be6 {the most solid, black prepares to reply to e5, cutting their Nh5 out of play, with ...f6} (14... Bg4 15. e5 $1 Rad8 16. Ne4 Ng6 17. Rad1 Rf8 18. h3 Bxe2 19. Bxe2 Nhf4 20. Bc4 Kh8 21. Rf3 f6 22. exf6 gxf6 23. Ng3 $14 {1-0 (41) Ivanchuk,V (2735)-Jussupow,A (2625) Brussels 1991 Candidates [Jussupow,A]}) ( 14... Qg5 15. e5 $1 $16 -- 16. Ne4 $140) {it may be easier for white to maintain an advantage by slowly building up and only advancing when fully prepred} 15. Rf2 $5 (15. e5 {playing against black's knight on the rim and grabbing space on the kingside can now be answered} f6 $5 {when white can still maintain some pressure with} (15... Rad8 16. Ne4 Bd5 17. Rf2 Bxe4 18. Bxe4 g6 19. Raf1 Rd7 {was played in 1-0 (53) Bruzon Batista,L (2662)-Soppe,G (2432) Buenos Aires 2005 and white already had the shot} 20. Rxf7 $1 $16) 16. Rae1 $1 {[%csl Ge5] keeping an eye on the center} Rad8 17. Ne4 fxe5 18. dxe5 Bd5 19. N2c3 Qxe5 20. Nf6+ Qxf6 21. Rxf6 Rxe1+ 22. Rf1 Rxf1+ 23. Bxf1 $16 { 1/2-1/2 (57) Krush,I (2424)-Johannessen,L (2427) Bermuda 2002}) 15... Nf6 ( 15... Rad8 16. Raf1 Ng6 $6 17. e5 $1 {black's knights are clumbsy} Qg5 18. Ne4 $1 {the white knight heads to an outpost on d6, deep in the enemy camp} Qe3 19. Nd6 Rxd6 20. exd6 {black couldn't tolerate the knights and parted with material, eventually losing in 1-0 (39) Onischuk,A (2687)-Gutierrez,F (2297) Monterrey 2010}) 16. h3 Rad8 17. Raf1 $14 Ng6 18. a3 Rf8 19. b4 a6 20. Na4 { white is in control} Nd7 21. e5 Qh4 22. Nf4 Nxf4 23. Rxf4 Qh6 $14 24. Qf2 $2 { but now a slip and black equalized} Nxe5 {1-0 (36) Bareev,E (2560)-Ahlander,B (2395) Naestved 1988} 25. Bxh7+ Qxh7 26. dxe5) (11... Ng6 {black redeploys the knight and covers the darksquare bishop's escapes. White will continue as planned, preparing e4.} 12. Rad1 $1 {[%csl Gd4] Useful prophylaxsis, white bolsters the center, keeping an eye on the d pawn as it will be loosened when white plays e4} (12. e4 $6 {isn't good at the moment due to the typical counterplay with} dxe4 13. fxe4 Ng4 $132) 12... -- (12... Nh5 {black aims for simplifications, which they will succeed in getting as white's bishop has no escape, but black's pieces are not well posiitoned to deal with e4 afterwards} 13. Bxe7 Qxe7 14. e4 $1 {white is ready to expand in the center as black's knights are sidelined} Qg5 (14... dxe4 15. fxe4 $16) 15. Qd2 (15. Kh1 $5) (15. e5 {would allow counterplay with} Nhf4 $132) 15... Qxd2 16. Rxd2 dxe4 17. fxe4 Be6 {white's center and better placed knights amount to a healthy advantage for white} 18. b4 {with the center under control white starts a minority attack on the flank} (18. e5 $5 {to keep black's knights out of play and try for Ne4-d6 was worth considering}) 18... Rad8 19. h3 Nf6 20. Rfd1 Re7 21. b5 Ne8 22. bxc6 bxc6 23. Na4 $14 {1/2-1/2 (37) Istratescu,A (2595)-Inkiov,V (2471) France 2003}) (12... h6 {forces white to part with the bishop pair, in return white gets in a quick e4 and develops a dangerous initiative as in the following example game:} 13. Bxf6 $1 (13. Bxh6 gxh6 14. Bxg6 fxg6 15. Qxg6+ Kh8 16. Qxh6+ Nh7 17. e4 $13) 13... Bxf6 14. Bxg6 $1 {giving up both bishops, but now the center comes to life, and white will get a pawn passed.} fxg6 15. e4 $1 {the thematic break} g5 16. e5 $14 Be7 17. f4 {white is developing an attack} gxf4 18. Nxf4 Rf8 19. Ng6 Rxf1+ 20. Rxf1 Be6 21. Ne2 Qd7 22. h4 Re8 23. Ng3 Bf7 24. Nxe7+ Rxe7 25. Nf5 Re6 26. Nd6 $16 {white has a clear advantage thanks to their center and better pieces} Bg6 27. Qc3 Rxd6 {black can no longer tolerate the knight and decides to part with some material to remove it, the rest is the WCH's technique} 28. exd6 Qxd6 29. Qa3 Qb8 30. Qe7 {1-0 (74) Kasparov,G (2851)-Barua,D (2555) Internet 2000 CBM 076 [Baburin]}) (12... Be6 {[%cal Ga8c8,Gc6c5] black sensibly continues development, preparing counterplay with . ..Rc8 and ...c5, white has tried many continuations in this classical position, i'll just include a few examples} 13. Ng3 {to clear the way for Re1 and support e4} (13. h3 {to prevent ...Ng4 is one way white has tried to prepare e4 }) (13. Kh1 Rc8 {transposes into the games from the move order with 11...Be6, 1-0 (36) Ivanchuk,V (2741)-Bruzon Batista,L (2648) Merida 2006}) 13... Rc8 14. Rfe1 (14. Rde1 c5 15. f4 {was played in 1-0 (52) Bareev,E (2685)-Jussupow,A (2655) Munich 1994, when Nf5!? and dxc5!? look like interesting alternatives}) 14... Nd7 $6 {this simplification allowed white to take advantage of the awkward black pieces on the 6th rank with...} (14... Bf8 15. f4 {a typical way to disturb the clumbsy Ng6 and Be6} Bg4 16. Rc1 Bd6 17. f5 {1-0 (44) Sasikiran, K (2653)-Belozerov,A (2488) Moscow 2010} Bxg3 18. fxg6 $5 Bxe1 19. gxf7+ Kxf7 20. Rxe1 $44) (14... c5 $6 {sees white change plans to play against the IQP as is often the case when black plays ...c5} 15. dxc5 Bxc5 16. Bb5 {black's pieces are a bit awkward and white takes advantage to stir up an initiative} Rf8 17. Nge4 Be7 18. Nxf6+ Bxf6 19. Bxf6 Qxf6 20. Rd4 $14 {a stable edge for white in ½-½ (32) Lambert,G (2397)-Bures,J (2425) ICCF email 2003}) 15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. f4 $1 {with the uncomfortable threat f5 on the cards white should obtain a large advantage 1-0 (37) Sasikiran,K (2700)-Caissalou playchess.com INT 2007})) (11... Be6 {This is one of black's main plans, developing and preparing ...Rc8 & ...c5 for counterplay, white would like to prepare an e4 push in the center, but needs to take prophylactic measures first. often Kh1, and bringing the aR to the center. It can either go the more route with agresssive Re1 or head to support the center with Rd1, both are quite reasonable and I will include a few instructive games and allow you to decide for yourself.} 12. Rae1 {this is an agressive placement for the rook, white's intentions are obvious, play e4} (12. Rad1 $5 {[%csl Gd4][%cal Ye3e4] white backs up the d pawn so that it will have support in case of e4 ...dxe4 opening the d line} Rc8 13. Kh1 {another useful prophylactic move, tucking the king away from any trouble before playing e4} (13. e4 {is not well timed on account of} dxe4 14. fxe4 Ng4 $5 {an annoying move that white should watch out for, black targets the darksquare bishop and the weakened darksquares}) 13... Ng6 14. a3 Nd7 (14... Qc7 15. Nf4 Bd7 16. Qf2 Rcd8 17. Rc1 Qd6 18. Nxg6 fxg6 19. Bf4 Qe6 20. Bc7 Rc8 21. Be5 Qf7 22. e4 {1/2-1/2 (38) Ivanchuk,V (2741)-Bruzon Batista,L (2648) Merida 2006}) 15. Bf4 $5 (15. Bxe7 Qxe7 {such simplifications are desirable for the defense, but this particular one usually comes at a cost, white's remaining bishop will be superior to it's counterpart.} 16. e4 $6 { white should again prefer to build up here, and maintains some edge, Ng3 or Rfe1 for instance} dxe4 17. fxe4 c5 $1 {another typical defensive resourse, black is at least fine here}) 15... a6 (15... Nxf4 $2 16. Bxh7+) 16. Bg3 c5 $5 {with e4 coming black looks to change the nature of the position} 17. e4 $1 { anyway, white is ready and it's now or never} (17. dxc5 Bxc5 18. Nd4 $14 { is another typical way to handle black's ...c5 break, playing against the IQP, or with the slightly better pieces in a symmetrical structure}) 17... Nf6 ( 17... c4 18. exd5 cxd3 19. Qxd3 $14) 18. e5 $1 {the center starts rolling, and with it white's initiative grows} Nd7 19. f4 c4 20. Bf5 Ndf8 21. Bh3 Bxh3 22. gxh3 Nh8 23. f5 $18 {and white's attack was winning in 1-0 (36) Ivanchuk,V (2741)-Bruzon Batista,L (2648) Merida 2006}) 12... Rc8 13. Kh1 {stepping the king away from any exposure, a typical preparatory move} N6d7 {the defender seeks simplifications, as is usually the case this is a trade off, eases some of white's pressure on their position and remains solid but white's pieces are somewhat more active than their couterparts} (13... c5 {would be premature and allows white to switch plans and play against an IQP} 14. dxc5 Bxc5 15. Nd4 $14 ) 14. Bxe7 {black has tried bothe recaptures here} Rxe7 {planning to have the rooks lead the way for the queen was tried against kasparov in the game i'll feature} (14... Qxe7 {is more natural, nonetheless white is eventually playing e4 with some edge} 15. Nf4 {white is planning Qf2, supporting d4, and then e4} Qd6 16. Qf2 f6 17. Nxe6 Nxe6 18. f4 $5 {e4!? right away would also have been good, this takes away ...Nf4 and keeps e4 in reserve} Ndf8 {after this its time } 19. e4 $1 dxe4 20. Nxe4 $14 {was better for the future WCH in ½-½ (38) Carlsen,M (2770)-Ivanchuk,V (2746) Leon 2009}) 15. Nf4 Rc7 ({another game continued} 15... Nf6 16. Qd2 b5 17. e4 $1 b4 18. Na4 dxe4 19. fxe4 Qxd4 20. e5 $16 {and white had a nearly winning game with dual threats of exf6 and Bxh7, which was later only drawn in ½-½ (52) Bareev,E (2675)-Asrian,K (2555) New York 1998}) 16. Qf2 $1 {typical prophylaxis, white is gearing up for the action in the center} Nf6 17. e4 $140 $1 {and, with everything prepared, is now ready} dxe4 18. fxe4 Rcd7 (18... Ng4 {is now a nonstarter} 19. Qg1 { gets out of trouble while keeping everything under control and white will chase the knight back with h3 shortly}) 19. d5 $1 {the dynamic pawn center stirs up trouble for the opponent} cxd5 20. Bb5 $1 {and black will be forced to return the material with interest} Rc7 21. exd5 Bd7 22. Be2 $1 (22. d6 $2 Rxe1) 22... Rc8 23. Qxa7 $18 b6 24. Qa6 Ne4 25. d6 $1 {good technique, now the endgame will be easily won as it white gets connected passers} Nxd6 26. Nfd5 Re5 27. Qxb6 Nf5 28. Qxd8 Rxd8 29. Bd3 Rxe1 30. Rxe1 Ng6 31. a4 Nd4 32. a5 Kf8 33. Bxg6 hxg6 34. Rd1 Ne6 35. Nb6 Bc6 36. Rxd8+ Nxd8 37. b4 Ne6 38. b5 { black threw in the towel 1-0 (38) Kasparov,G (2750)-Andersson,U (2605) Belfort 1988}) *
A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)
[Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "?"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] [SourceDate "2016.03.19"] {WEBSITE UNDER CONSTRUCTION} 1. g4 e5 2. f3 Qh4# {PLEASE EXCUSE MY BLUNDERS!} *